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Oswald
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Default Penalty declined? - 12.02.2012, 03:56 PM

when the ref says, "penalty" declined/ refused. what does he mean as in for example the referee says intentional grounding, penalty declined???

- what does AFC and NFC stand for.
- when is the NFL season (eg what months)
- Do Quaterbacks often change teams between seasons.
- On Gamepass can you watch, pause, etc old games, and replay games for that week.
- what are the different positions? Is there 11 players in Defence and Offence.
- Whats the scoring system, as in how many points for a touchdown/ conversion. etc

Last edited by Oswald; 12.02.2012 at 03:59 PM..
   
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Andyf
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Default 12.02.2012, 04:05 PM

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Originally Posted by Oswald View Post
when the ref says, "penalty" declined/ refused. what does he mean as in for example the referee says intentional grounding, penalty declined???

- what does AFC and NFC stand for.
- when is the NFL season (eg what months)
- Do Quaterbacks change teams alot between seasons.
- On Gamepass can you watch, pause, etc old games, and replay games for that week.
The opposing team can opt to not accept the penalty. For example if a team has the ball 3rd and long, rushes for 3 yards but commits a holding penalty, the opposing team will likely decline the penalty (penalty accepted: 3rd and even longer. Penalty declined: 4th and longish, they'll punt).

-American and National Football Conferences respectively
-Preseason- 4 exhibition/friendlies during August
-Regular season- Sept-Jan
-Post season Jan-early Feb.
-Probably less so than other positions. 'Franchise QBs' are considered the most valuable players on the team, so teams will do their utmost to keep talent at that spot. But you do get changes every season, mostly from teams who are still searching for a good QB. There are occasional exceptions; Jay Cutler in 09 offseason after falling out with Josh McDaniels. Or older big name QBs near the end of their careers (Brett Favre, Peyton Manning (?))
-Yes, they archive games from the last two seasons as well, so 2009,2010, 2011 at the moment, plus a few classic superbowls. There are some games that are exclusive rights to Sky in the UK and are 'blacked out', so that you can't watch them until a week later.

Last edited by Andyf; 12.02.2012 at 04:29 PM..
   
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Default 12.02.2012, 04:24 PM

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Originally Posted by Andyf View Post
The opposing team can opt to not accept the penalty. For example if a team has the ball 3rd and long, rushes for 3 yards but commits a holding penalty, the opposing team will likely decline the penalty (penalty accepted: 3rd and even longer. Penalty declined: 4th and longish, they'll punt).

-American and National Football Conferences respectively
-Preseason- 4 exhibition/friendlies during August
-Regular season- Sept-Jan
-Post season Jan-early Feb.
-Probably less so than other positions. 'Franchise QBs' are considered the most valuable players on the team, so teams will do their utmost to keep talent at that spot. But you do get changes every season, mostly from teams who are still searching for a good QB. There are occasional exceptions; Jay Cutler in 09 offseason after falling out with Josh McDaniels. Or older big name QBs near the end of their careers (Brett Favre, Payton Manning (?))
-Yes, they archive games from the last two seasons as well, so 2009,2010, 2011 at the moment, plus a few classic superbowls. There are some games that are exclusive rights to Sky in the UK and are 'blacked out', so that you can't watch them until a week later.
Thankyou. Andyf, pretty much answered all my questions.
   
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abyssobenthonic
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Default 13.02.2012, 04:41 AM

On the scoring:

6 points for touchdown*
3 points for field goal (whether from place kick, drop kick, or free kick)
2 points for safety (historically known as a "safety touchdown"... the endzone was in years past simply called "touch"; "touchdown" derives from the ball being down in touch, not from touching the ball down as in rugby (though for the first few years of the game, the rules did more closely resemble rugby in this [among others] respect))

After scoring a TD:
2 points for a touchdown on the conversion
1 point for a field goal on the conversion

In some versions of the rulebook (e.g. college rules; NFL Europe also played with this rule), there's also the defensive conversion, worth 2 points for the defense, which occurs if the return a fumble, interception, or blocked kick across the other goal line and the conversion safety, worth 1 point (if the conversion would have resulted in a safety had it been in normal play... the relatively most common scenario for this is a defender intercepts the ball or recovers a fumble outside the endzone and retreats on his own initiative (not from momentum of taking possession nor from being tackled) into the endzone, where he's tackled: the team attempting to convert would then score 1 point; it could also happen if a returner as above were stripped with the ball going out of bounds or recovered by the attempting team in their end zone). There is apparently an ambiguity in the NFL rulebook that may allow for conversion safeties to be scored.

Canadian football also has the rouge, which scores 1 point for the kicking team if the ball is legally kicked into the end zone without scoring a field goal (Canadian football places the goalposts on the goal line) and the receiving team does not return or kick the ball out of the end zone; this score is similar to the "behind" in Aussie rules and a similar score exists in Gaelic football.

*: a touchdown can also be awarded by the referee as a consequence of the other team committing a palpably unfair act (e.g. a player from the bench tackling a runner who is certain to score)
   
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Default 13.02.2012, 08:07 PM

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Originally Posted by abyssobenthonic View Post
On the scoring:

6 points for touchdown*
3 points for field goal (whether from place kick, drop kick, or free kick)
2 points for safety (historically known as a "safety touchdown"... the endzone was in years past simply called "touch"; "touchdown" derives from the ball being down in touch, not from touching the ball down as in rugby (though for the first few years of the game, the rules did more closely resemble rugby in this [among others] respect))

After scoring a TD:
2 points for a touchdown on the conversion
1 point for a field goal on the conversion

In some versions of the rulebook (e.g. college rules; NFL Europe also played with this rule), there's also the defensive conversion, worth 2 points for the defense, which occurs if the return a fumble, interception, or blocked kick across the other goal line and the conversion safety, worth 1 point (if the conversion would have resulted in a safety had it been in normal play... the relatively most common scenario for this is a defender intercepts the ball or recovers a fumble outside the endzone and retreats on his own initiative (not from momentum of taking possession nor from being tackled) into the endzone, where he's tackled: the team attempting to convert would then score 1 point; it could also happen if a returner as above were stripped with the ball going out of bounds or recovered by the attempting team in their end zone). There is apparently an ambiguity in the NFL rulebook that may allow for conversion safeties to be scored.

Canadian football also has the rouge, which scores 1 point for the kicking team if the ball is legally kicked into the end zone without scoring a field goal (Canadian football places the goalposts on the goal line) and the receiving team does not return or kick the ball out of the end zone; this score is similar to the "behind" in Aussie rules and a similar score exists in Gaelic football.

*: a touchdown can also be awarded by the referee as a consequence of the other team committing a palpably unfair act (e.g. a player from the bench tackling a runner who is certain to score)
Excellent info, thanks! well explained.
   
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Default 14.02.2012, 03:07 AM

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Originally Posted by Oswald View Post
- what does AFC and NFC stand for.
As stated above, American and National Football Conferences. American professional sports leagues are generally divided into two conferences, which are then sub-divided into two or more regional divisions. In the case of the NFL, the AFC and NFC used to be separate, independent leagues known as the AFL and NFL. They merged under the NFL name but retained separate identities as conferences. (A few teams have switched sides and many others have been added since the merger.)

Quote:
- what are the different positions? Is there 11 players in Defence and Offence
Each side is allowed to put 11 players on the field. With the exception of the offense being required to put 7 players on the line of scrimmage, you can put players anywhere you want on your side of the line, but you'll usually see the following positions:

Offense

Linemen - 99.99% of the time, there will be 5 men lined up shoulder-to-shoulder on the ball. The Center is over the ball, two Guards stand to each side of him, and two Tackles (named after a leverage mechanism; they don't tackle anyone) stand to either side of the Guards. Their job is to push defenders out of the way. They are the only 5 players who are not allowed to catch passes from the quarterback (handoffs and laterals are okay).

Backs - Players who stand in back of the linemen. Quarterbacks are usually passing specialists. Halfbacks are usually running specialists. Fullbacks are usually blocking specialists. They are named for how far behind the line they stood in the early days of gridiron football, but in the modern game, the fullback is usually lined up between the quarterback and halfback.

Ends - Players lined up at either end of the linemen. Tight Ends stay tight to the Tackles, while Split Ends (more popularly referred to as Wide Receivers) are split wide to either side. The wides are receiving specialists, while the tight ends are expected to contribute as both receivers and blockers.

Defense

Line - Tackles on the interior, Ends at either end. In a 3 man defensive line, the lone Defensive Tackle is often referred to as a Nose Guard. Their job is not to be pushed around by the offensive linemen.

Linebackers - The equivalent of Backs on offense, they line up behind the defensive linemen, usually 3 or 4 left to right. They are subdivided into Middle or Inside Linebackers and Outside Linebackers. When you hear references to the "Mike", that is the nickname for the Middle Linebacker. Linebackers do everything: take on blockers, cover receivers, blitz quarterbacks, and chase down runners.

Backs - Confusingly not the equivalent of offensive backs, Defensive Backs are subdivided into Cornerbacks and Safeties. Cornerbacks are pass coverage specialists who line up across from wide receivers. Safeties line up in the deep centerfield as the last line of defense, helping out in pass coverage and chasing down runners. Nickelbacks and Dimebacks are extra cornerbacks who come on the field in place of linebackers or linemen when more pass coverage specialists are desired.

Special Teams

Kicker - kicks field goals from a hold or kicks off from a tee.

Punter - kicks dropkick-style without a holder or a tee.

Holder - holds the ball in place for the kicker. Why not just dropkick the ball like a punter? Because the rules require that the ball must touch the ground before it is kicked to count as a field goal. Punters don't try to score field goals, they are just trying to re-position the ball far downfield before the other team takes possession of it.

Returner - catches kicks and punts and runs them back.

There are more positions than this, but that's 99% of what you'll see.
   
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Bean49
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Default 14.02.2012, 08:13 AM

To the OP, have a look at this site, will tell you pretty much anything you want to know about players, positions and schemes

http://football.calsci.com/Positions.html
   
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Default 14.02.2012, 09:00 PM

Thanks over the past few days, I have learnt alot more about the Game. Thanks for the Info.
   
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Default 14.02.2012, 09:01 PM

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Originally Posted by Lastminuteman View Post
As stated above, American and National Football Conferences. American professional sports leagues are generally divided into two conferences, which are then sub-divided into two or more regional divisions. In the case of the NFL, the AFC and NFC used to be separate, independent leagues known as the AFL and NFL. They merged under the NFL name but retained separate identities as conferences. (A few teams have switched sides and many others have been added since the merger.)



Each side is allowed to put 11 players on the field. With the exception of the offense being required to put 7 players on the line of scrimmage, you can put players anywhere you want on your side of the line, but you'll usually see the following positions:

Offense

Linemen - 99.99% of the time, there will be 5 men lined up shoulder-to-shoulder on the ball. The Center is over the ball, two Guards stand to each side of him, and two Tackles (named after a leverage mechanism; they don't tackle anyone) stand to either side of the Guards. Their job is to push defenders out of the way. They are the only 5 players who are not allowed to catch passes from the quarterback (handoffs and laterals are okay).

Backs - Players who stand in back of the linemen. Quarterbacks are usually passing specialists. Halfbacks are usually running specialists. Fullbacks are usually blocking specialists. They are named for how far behind the line they stood in the early days of gridiron football, but in the modern game, the fullback is usually lined up between the quarterback and halfback.

Ends - Players lined up at either end of the linemen. Tight Ends stay tight to the Tackles, while Split Ends (more popularly referred to as Wide Receivers) are split wide to either side. The wides are receiving specialists, while the tight ends are expected to contribute as both receivers and blockers.

Defense

Line - Tackles on the interior, Ends at either end. In a 3 man defensive line, the lone Defensive Tackle is often referred to as a Nose Guard. Their job is not to be pushed around by the offensive linemen.

Linebackers - The equivalent of Backs on offense, they line up behind the defensive linemen, usually 3 or 4 left to right. They are subdivided into Middle or Inside Linebackers and Outside Linebackers. When you hear references to the "Mike", that is the nickname for the Middle Linebacker. Linebackers do everything: take on blockers, cover receivers, blitz quarterbacks, and chase down runners.

Backs - Confusingly not the equivalent of offensive backs, Defensive Backs are subdivided into Cornerbacks and Safeties. Cornerbacks are pass coverage specialists who line up across from wide receivers. Safeties line up in the deep centerfield as the last line of defense, helping out in pass coverage and chasing down runners. Nickelbacks and Dimebacks are extra cornerbacks who come on the field in place of linebackers or linemen when more pass coverage specialists are desired.

Special Teams

Kicker - kicks field goals from a hold or kicks off from a tee.

Punter - kicks dropkick-style without a holder or a tee.

Holder - holds the ball in place for the kicker. Why not just dropkick the ball like a punter? Because the rules require that the ball must touch the ground before it is kicked to count as a field goal. Punters don't try to score field goals, they are just trying to re-position the ball far downfield before the other team takes possession of it.

Returner - catches kicks and punts and runs them back.

There are more positions than this, but that's 99% of what you'll see.
Thanks over the past few days, I have learnt alot more about the Game. Thanks for the Info.
   
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Default 14.02.2012, 09:02 PM

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Originally Posted by Bean49 View Post
To the OP, have a look at this site, will tell you pretty much anything you want to know about players, positions and schemes

http://football.calsci.com/Positions.html
Yeah the website is excellent. Thanks!
   
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