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  #1  
Old 15.05.2013, 06:04 PM
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Default The Top Earners in US Sport - $$$

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When welterweight Floyd Mayweather was No. 1 on Sports Illustrated’s Fortunate 50 last year—knocking out Tiger Woods, who had been No. 1 every year since SI started producing the list in 2004—it looked like a fluke, the result of the $85 million he received for his fights with Victor Ortiz and Miguel Cotto. Now Mayweather is proving that he belongs at the top. From just two bouts this year, one earlier this month and the other scheduled for September, he will earn at least $90 million, and that’s conservative; he could make as much as $128 million.

There are other notable shifts this year. LeBron James (No. 2) passed Kobe Bryant (No. 4). Tiger Woods (No. 5) is back above Phil Mickelson (No. 6)—thanks to $4 million more in tour winnings. Drew Brees wasn’t on last year’s list but he burst into the top five thanks to a $37 million signing bonus from his new contract.

The findings consist solely of salary, winnings, bonuses and endorsements. SI consulted players’ associations, tour records, online databases, agents and media reports. The endorsement estimates come from a stable of marketing executives, agents and other experts, including Burns Entertainment & Sports Marketing.

Candidates for the Fortunate 50 must be U.S. citizens or play in a U.S.—based league. Endorsements reflect current deals, and salaries are based on current or most recently completed seasons; for instance, for NFL players the season that ended in February was used. (Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco’s new deal, which will pay him $20.1 million next season, isn’t reflected.) For auto racing and tennis, prize money came from the 2012 calendar year. Golf earnings are from July 1, 2012 through April 21, 2013. Boxing purses are from August 2012 through May 2013 (but projected money from bouts through September was included since fight deals are done on a yearly basis).
Flacco and Aaron Rodgers will be on next year's list. Flacco will earn $30m in cash from the Ravens while Rodgers takes home $39.5m, and that's before his growing portfolio of endorsements.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/spe...-mayweather-jr

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/spe...1_a2&eref=sihp

Drew Brees was the highest ranked NFL player in 3rd, behind Floyd Mayweather and LeBron James. Brees earned a total of $47.8m for the 2012 season. Peyton Manning, Vincent Jackson, Mario Williams, Carl Nicks, Matt Schaub, Calvin Johnson and Eli Manning were the other NFL players in the Top 50. RG3 was 54th.

Large signing bonuses helped Nicks, Mario, Schaub, Jackson and Megatron reach the Top 50. On a list dominated by baseball and basketball, it's the QBs who earn the big endorsement money which gives them a chance of seeing their names again in the future.
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Old 15.05.2013, 07:39 PM
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So an athlete in a sport no one watches anymore in the US is #1.

...and a sport with the shortest/most peril career lifespan is lagging way behind...baseball and basketball.

This is why the owners love them some Goodell. Salary Cap, revenue sharing, lowball salaries and very little guaranteed money...play for pay, year-to-year contracts.

There's very little incentive coupled with the injury concern to raise another generation of NFL superstars. Baseball and basketball...cradle to the grave.
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Old 16.05.2013, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HolyRoller10 View Post
So an athlete in a sport no one watches anymore in the US is #1.

...and a sport with the shortest/most peril career lifespan is lagging way behind...baseball and basketball.

This is why the owners love them some Goodell. Salary Cap, revenue sharing, lowball salaries and very little guaranteed money...play for pay, year-to-year contracts.

There's very little incentive coupled with the injury concern to raise another generation of NFL superstars. Baseball and basketball...cradle to the grave.
I’ve always wondered why this is!!!!
Do we know why?

In any other country, the value of sport is related to the popularity of that sport, i.e. more TV viewers, more bums on seats in stadiums etc.

Is it because in Baseball and Basketball they have over 100 regular season games, so overall they have more fans through the turnstyles and more TV time????
Is it simply because the NFL don’t give the TV money to the players, i.e. strict salary caps etc?

Surely, if every college kid wanted to play baseball or basketball because they would get more money and less risk, then the NFL would be forced to up the money of the players.
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Old 16.05.2013, 02:23 PM
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It's more difficult to make an NBA roster than NFL roster just by numbers. The NBA only has a 13 man roster and the superstars earn a much larger % of the cap. Miami Heat's Big 3 earn about 90% of the team's cap, which is a soft cap unlike the NFL's hard cap.
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Old 16.05.2013, 04:23 PM
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Average Salaries:

NBA: $5.15 million (2010-11)

MLB: $3.34 million (2010)

NHL: $2.4 million (2010-11)

NFL: $1.9 million (2010)

"There are far more players divvying up the NFL pie, with 53 players per team compared to a maximum of 15 in the NBA, 23 in the NHL and 25 in baseball. NBA players are more "elite" simply because there are fewer of them.

Next, because of those smaller rosters, the impact of any one player on an NBA team in theory is greater than any one player in the other sports. A starter in the NBA is 20 percent of his team's primary lineup, compared to 16.7 percent in hockey, 11.1 percent in baseball or 4.5 percent in football (22 starters, offense and defense combined).

There probably is no more important position in those four sports than NFL quarterback, but the fact is, he's on the field half the time (or less, allowing for special teams). A starting pitcher can dominate a ball game by himself -- but he sits out four of every five games. A hot goaltender can alter the course of a Stanley Cup series but he's a specialist, too, who won't be scoring many goals for his club.

An NBA superstar, meanwhile, can contribute for 40 minutes or more out of each game's 48. Between points scored, rebounds grabbed and assists dished, he can account for much of his team's scoring or second chances. And the best of them play just as hard, and nearly as effectively, at the defensive end. Even bench players, if they're in their teams' rotation, have defined and significant roles."

Lets not also forget the job Stern did in growing the NBA into a global brand, he also gave up team identity and franchise control in favor of superstardom. The individual superstar runs the league in the NBA...makes it go around - is the promoted and the sought after - high visibility and a marketing scheme designed to make the NBA produce global icons ala Ali and Soccer stars. NBA didn't want to sell the sport - they wanted to sell the Stars.

NFL sells the sport - no individual is above the sport - the owners control the league - if you don't like your salary go play in Canada...Lenin and Stalin would approve.

NBA salaries being the highest reflect the market and size of the teams and size of the league. It's become a globabl sport played almost everywhere...and yet, unlike soccer...basketball really only has ONE major league...the NBA...soccer has a bunch of "somewhat" comparable leagues around the globe. No Asian, European or South American league is in the same realm as the NBA.

So...making the NBA is probably the most difficult thing to do in the world of sports odds-wise. Making the NBA has been calculated to be more ridiculous than winning the lottery twice.
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Old 11.06.2019, 07:44 PM
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The 2019 Forbes Top 100.

Lionel Messi edges out Cristiano Ronaldo for top spot. Russell Wilson and Aaron Rodgers are in the Top 10 thanks to new contracts and a huge signing bonus.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/48602166
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