Why don’t more great players become coaches? - NFL UK Forums
NFL UK Mobile Logo
Go Back   NFL UK Forums > National Football League > NFL season

  #1  
Old 07.02.2018, 07:30 PM
forest49's Avatar
forest49 forest49 is offline
Starter
 
Join Date: 04.11.2015
Posts: 146
Default Why don’t more great players become coaches?

I was wondering this, given how few of the recent hires have been familiar playing names (Vrabel the only one I really remember on the field).

It would seem like a natural progression for a HoF QB in particular, the QBC/OC/HC route, but I can’t think of any recent examples. Elway has become a GM I suppose... is it just that the media is “easier” as a post-playing career?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07.02.2018, 07:50 PM
Crash11's Avatar
Crash11 Crash11 is offline
Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: 07.09.2006
Posts: 16,914
Default

Top players with millions in the bank and a legacy secured don't in the main need the grief and 20 hour days.

The NFL is so different to Football where a manager in the main has to have been a player to a decent level to secure a post and the supposed 'respect' of his players who look down on those who haven't played the game

But there has been a number of ex NFL players who have in recent years secured top Coaching jobs - Mike Vrabel being the most recent.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07.02.2018, 07:57 PM
boknows34's Avatar
boknows34 boknows34 is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: 03.03.2006
Posts: 15,471
Default

Coaching is a really hard, stressful and difficult slog and great players will have much more opportunities with television, whether it's in the studio or commentary box.

It's not just the NFL, but NBA and MLB superstars like Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson and Derek Jeter have also made so much money they can move into senior front office roles and team ownership.

Backup QB is actually a great foundation for future coaching jobs. Jason Garrett, Gary Kubiak, Doug Pederson and Frank Reich were career backups. Jim Harbaugh was a journeyman and Sean Payton was also a QB. A name to watch in the future is Kellen Moore.

Last edited by boknows34; 07.02.2018 at 08:01 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07.02.2018, 08:04 PM
forest49's Avatar
forest49 forest49 is offline
Starter
 
Join Date: 04.11.2015
Posts: 146
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crash11 View Post
Top players with millions in the bank and a legacy secured don't in the main need the grief and 20 hour days.

The NFL is so different to Football where a manager in the main has to have been a player to a decent level to secure a post and the supposed 'respect' of his players who look down on those who haven't played the game

But there has been a number of ex NFL players who have in recent years secured top Coaching jobs - Mike Vrabel being the most recent.
I’d still have thought top players would miss playing to the extent that being a top level coach would be the only thing that came remotely close to it. OK, some might prefer less pressured alternatives, but that’s equally true in “soccer” as well...

My comment was regarding the lack of superstar/HoF players as head coaches and coordinators, but I always assumed most coaches had played in the NFL to some level, even if many were just obscure special teamers and practice squad members, which is why I didn’t remember them (along with the fact that I didn’t follow it that closely >10 years ago). Is it really the case that the majority have never played the game beyond high school/college level?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07.02.2018, 09:14 PM
European Bob's Avatar
European Bob European Bob is offline
MVP
 
Join Date: 11.01.2012
Posts: 8,299
Default

Being a great player doesn't make you a great coach and vice versa. Put it in a more mundane context - is the guy who is the best worker on the car factory assembly line the best person to manage the factory when he gets a bit older? Possibly. But most probably not. Doing it and managing/coaching it are very different skills.

And as others have said, coaching is brutal. They got into work at about 4am every day and are there until very late at night, or don't even go home and just sleep at the facility. Extremely high stress and pressure. You barely see your family between training camp in July and January, and then again around the draft and free agency. Understandable that many who earned a lot of money already would not be interested in this. Better to do a gig for TV a couple of days a week.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08.02.2018, 09:43 AM
Phisch_2's Avatar
Phisch_2 Phisch_2 is offline
Team Captain
 
Join Date: 26.01.2011
Posts: 471
Default

Mike Singletary immediatley springs to mind, showed excellent credentials as a LB coach with the Ravens but moved onto HC position with the 49ers and...it didnt go so well. As has been said i think most want to spend time with loved ones and enjoy retirement rather than increase their workload...hence the move into TV
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08.02.2018, 10:07 PM
forest49's Avatar
forest49 forest49 is offline
Starter
 
Join Date: 04.11.2015
Posts: 146
Default

Found this, though a few years old.

http://www.post-gazette.com/sports/a...s/201408240108

Agrees with some of the points made here, though seemingly in the past a lot more HCs had played in the NFL, and other American sports have a much higher proportion of ex-player coaches. Seems most NFL coaches at least played the game in college, but a few never did so competitively at all.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09.02.2018, 08:59 AM
BuffaloG's Avatar
BuffaloG BuffaloG is offline
All Pro
 
Join Date: 12.10.2014
Posts: 4,496
Default

You make a lot of money for much less effort, much more flexible to family life by doing a media job
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +0. The time now is 11:06 AM.