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  #4571  
Old 09.11.2017, 10:18 PM
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Looks like Louis CK is trending,cant be good.
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  #4572  
Old 10.11.2017, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by lee harris 10 View Post
Looks like Louis CK is trending,cant be good.
Reading what his go to move is I think he might be every monkey I have ever seen in a zoo
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  #4573  
Old 11.11.2017, 09:53 AM
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From the sound of it, it was consesual with Louis CK so I can't understand how he can be compared to Harvey Weinstein et al.
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  #4574  
Old 18.11.2017, 10:20 PM
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The current state of Brexit talks..

The Irish red line is a seamless border with Northern Ireland. This is only possible if either the UK remains in the customs union or Northern Ireland does. Bottom line is either there is no border (UK stays in customs union), or there is a border - in which case where is it? The Tories took the no-border off the table before talks even began. The DUP will not permit a border between Northern Ireland and the mainland. The UK position therefore is for a proper border - between Ireland the Northern Ireland, with custons checks, immigration checks, etc. That is just what a border is.

The EU want to the UK to explain what it is prepared to pay for in the divorce, and what it is not. The UK won't do that, because if it starts examining the individual topics (pensions, commitments etc) it will have great difficulty disagreeing with many of them, because a lot of them are reasonable and the cost is astronomical. The UK expects the EU to just take a bung and shut up.

This is like a diner refusing to pay for a £60 meal when he leaves the restaurant. The waiter calls him back. He doesn't want to pay. What items on the bill does he object to? He won't say, instead fishing out a £20 note and offering that. No, says the waiter. Look at the bill. What items seem unreasonable? You ate all of this. Is it the service charge you object to? The customer won't say. £20 should be enough, he says. He might throw in another fiver. He is in a bind because he told his wife the meal was not going to cost them anything. £20 is bad enough, but £60! She'll murder him.
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  #4575  
Old 19.11.2017, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by davidjones178@hotmail.co.uk View Post
The current state of Brexit talks..

The Irish red line is a seamless border with Northern Ireland. This is only possible if either the UK remains in the customs union or Northern Ireland does. Bottom line is either there is no border (UK stays in customs union), or there is a border - in which case where is it? The Tories took the no-border off the table before talks even began. The DUP will not permit a border between Northern Ireland and the mainland. The UK position therefore is for a proper border - between Ireland the Northern Ireland, with custons checks, immigration checks, etc. That is just what a border is.

The EU want to the UK to explain what it is prepared to pay for in the divorce, and what it is not. The UK won't do that, because if it starts examining the individual topics (pensions, commitments etc) it will have great difficulty disagreeing with many of them, because a lot of them are reasonable and the cost is astronomical. The UK expects the EU to just take a bung and shut up.

This is like a diner refusing to pay for a £60 meal when he leaves the restaurant. The waiter calls him back. He doesn't want to pay. What items on the bill does he object to? He won't say, instead fishing out a £20 note and offering that. No, says the waiter. Look at the bill. What items seem unreasonable? You ate all of this. Is it the service charge you object to? The customer won't say. £20 should be enough, he says. He might throw in another fiver. He is in a bind because he told his wife the meal was not going to cost them anything. £20 is bad enough, but £60! She'll murder him.
surely its been said but wouldn't it be easy for some experts to go through the EU accounts and see what the UK has agreed and committed to pay towards on-going projects and that should be the figure that could be agreed then start the real talks and add any new fee's from there.

seems the EU want a massive win with an eye watering number so it can claim victory and the people in the UK who don't want to leave can use this bill as a reason to continue with there quest to obstruct the leaving process.

saw spin doctor Campbell on the BBC this morning and he seems in his element at the moment arguing for the EU and its partners to play hardball on every possible issue.
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  #4576  
Old 19.11.2017, 06:13 PM
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Originally Posted by lee harris 10 View Post
surely its been said but wouldn't it be easy for some experts to go through the EU accounts and see what the UK has agreed and committed to pay towards on-going projects and that should be the figure that could be agreed then start the real talks and add any new fee's from there.

seems the EU want a massive win with an eye watering number so it can claim victory and the people in the UK who don't want to leave can use this bill as a reason to continue with there quest to obstruct the leaving process.

saw spin doctor Campbell on the BBC this morning and he seems in his element at the moment arguing for the EU and its partners to play hardball on every possible issue.
it seems to be another thing the leavers are trying to sweep under the carpet.

someone needs to do something to try and get us out of this mess but May lacks the backbone to stand up for what she believes in.
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  #4577  
Old 20.11.2017, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by lee harris 10 View Post
surely its been said but wouldn't it be easy for some experts to go through the EU accounts and see what the UK has agreed and committed to pay towards on-going projects and that should be the figure that could be agreed then start the real talks and add any new fee's from there.
Yes, that has been done. It comes to appx £60bn. This is net, meaning the true liabilities are higher, but by deducting our share of assets the value comes down to appx £60bn.

https://www.instituteforgovernment.o...u-divorce-bill

This is why the UK government does *not* want to go through the EU accounts. It carefully avoids naming figures and won't agree to any methodology, because that takes us back to the £60bn.

Personally I think that is too high. While I can see why we should cover a fair share of pension costs and some budgetary commitments, I don't see why we should pay for projects that have not even begun. Yes, we - along with the other EU nations - agreed to fund them. But it's not as if nothing has changed.

Paying for everything as planned until 2020 as if nothing has happened seems a bit like a couple who are divorcing - and the wife demanding he pay for all the holidays they were planning together.

I also don't see why it needs to be all hard figures. The pensions issue could be solved by the UK issuing financial instruments which automatically pay out the relative share of pension liabilities. The EU could then sell these on financial markets as and when needed.

The same for the loans to Hungary, Ireland etc which make up appx £10bn of the bill. This money would be reimbursed (unless the countries default), so surely this could be resolved through the insurance markets.

The benefit of involving the financial markets being that these are chiefly in London.

But I suppose that is all detail. The Daily Mail et al are perched on the Tories shoulders, calculator in hand, ready to add up any commitments and rip out a banner headline that will topple May and install Bove. Or Goris?
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  #4578  
Old 20.11.2017, 11:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidjones178@hotmail.co.uk View Post
The current state of Brexit talks..

The Irish red line is a seamless border with Northern Ireland. This is only possible if either the UK remains in the customs union or Northern Ireland does. Bottom line is either there is no border (UK stays in customs union), or there is a border - in which case where is it? The Tories took the no-border off the table before talks even began. The DUP will not permit a border between Northern Ireland and the mainland. The UK position therefore is for a proper border - between Ireland the Northern Ireland, with custons checks, immigration checks, etc. That is just what a border is.

The EU want to the UK to explain what it is prepared to pay for in the divorce, and what it is not. The UK won't do that, because if it starts examining the individual topics (pensions, commitments etc) it will have great difficulty disagreeing with many of them, because a lot of them are reasonable and the cost is astronomical. The UK expects the EU to just take a bung and shut up.

This is like a diner refusing to pay for a £60 meal when he leaves the restaurant. The waiter calls him back. He doesn't want to pay. What items on the bill does he object to? He won't say, instead fishing out a £20 note and offering that. No, says the waiter. Look at the bill. What items seem unreasonable? You ate all of this. Is it the service charge you object to? The customer won't say. £20 should be enough, he says. He might throw in another fiver. He is in a bind because he told his wife the meal was not going to cost them anything. £20 is bad enough, but £60! She'll murder him.
This is why there can't be a deal. There is just too much face to lose for Brexit politicians. The only way they can save face is to shout about bloody Eurocrats holding us back and storming off saying that actually we don't need you anyway we can do it by ourselves. Which, in a microcosm, is what Brexit has always been about.
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  #4579  
Old 21.11.2017, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by European Bob View Post
This is why there can't be a deal. There is just too much face to lose for Brexit politicians. The only way they can save face is to shout about bloody Eurocrats holding us back and storming off saying that actually we don't need you anyway we can do it by ourselves. Which, in a microcosm, is what Brexit has always been about.
Local seafood processing industry seeks free trade status for Brexit voting Grimsby.

http://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/ne...seafood-736984

What a good idea! Free trade status for Grimsby. And while we are at it - for everywhere else. Got to be a good thing, right?

That would be the single market.

Head. Desk. Repeat.
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  #4580  
Old 22.11.2017, 08:10 AM
dairees dairees is offline
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Originally Posted by davidjones178@hotmail.co.uk View Post
Local seafood processing industry seeks free trade status for Brexit voting Grimsby.

http://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/ne...seafood-736984

What a good idea! Free trade status for Grimsby. And while we are at it - for everywhere else. Got to be a good thing, right?

That would be the single market.

Head. Desk. Repeat.
Could we add Stoke to the list as they want a similar free trade status to protect their pottery industry from Chinese dumping?

And Cornwall to ensure their agricultural industries get access to the seasonal workforce they need.

No prizes for guessing which way the majority of people in Grimsby, Stoke and Cornwall voted in the referendum of course.

While we're at it Swindon and Sunderland probably want in too due to the presence of large car manufacturers in those towns. Northern Ireland perhaps too - although there's a different driver over there.
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