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  #41  
Old 10.10.2007, 05:35 PM
KL666 KL666 is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

Got a quick Question guys, on monday night football ( Dallas vs Buffalo's)
When T.O was ment to have Spiked the ball (which he didnt jus the Ref was a ****) what action was taken for this ?
Coz i didnt understand !
~X~
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  #42  
Old 24.10.2007, 07:27 PM
isf21@cam.ac.uk isf21@cam.ac.uk is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

[quote author=KL666 link=board=12;threadid=8473;start=30#msg750368 date=1192037733]
Got a quick Question guys, on monday night football ( Dallas vs Buffalo's)
When T.O was ment to have Spiked the ball (which he didnt jus the Ref was a ****) what action was taken for this ?
Coz i didnt understand !
~X~
[/quote]

Spiking the ball is a delay of game penalty (because then the officials have to go and get the ball to spot it), unless you spike it directly at an opponent in which case it's sometimes called as taunting, which is "unsportsmanlike conduct". Delay of game is a five yard penalty, unsportsmanlike conduct fifteen; both assessed at the end of the play.
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  #43  
Old 28.10.2007, 11:42 AM
KL666 KL666 is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

Oh kk lol, thanx for answerin my question ;D ...
~X~
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  #44  
Old 04.11.2007, 08:01 PM
DEANO--M-- DEANO--M-- is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

Im new to the nfl its great ...Id ont understand how the league works an it is really gettin to me >

like east and west,is it like the top 2 teams from each group go into the playoffs??

Please sumbody fill me in.thanks
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  #45  
Old 07.11.2007, 08:11 PM
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TheresOnlyOneLT TheresOnlyOneLT is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

The league has a total of 32 teams divided into 2 conferences, the AFC (American Football Conf.) and the NFC (National **). These 2 conferences roughly parallel the 2 separate leagues that existed before the merger (around 1970): The AFL and the old, smaller NFL.

Each conference is further divided into 4 divisions: North, South, East and West, for a total of eight divisions. Each division has exactly 4 teams. Each team plays 16 games, evenly divided between home and away, over a 17-week season. Thus every team has a week off (a "bye&quot at some point during the season. Games are typically played on Sunday afternoons (east coast time) but there is a single Sunday night and Monday night game all season long, as well as late season Saturday games, early season Thursday night games, and the traditional Thanksgiving day Thursday games (always hosted by Dallas and Detroit.)

Each team plays every other team in its division twice, home and away. Each division also plays all the teams in 1 division from within the conference (on a rotating 3-year cycle) and 1 division from the other conference (on a 4-year cycle.) The remaining 2 games are against intra-conference opponents who had a similar record the previous season.

The team with the best overall record in each division wins the division. Should there be a tie, a series of tie-breakers are invoked: head-to-head, division record, conf. record, points for, against, etc. These 4 divisional winners (per conference) are then
ranked or "seeded" 1-4 using the above "tie-breaking" criteria. Furthermore the 2 best teams in each conference that don't win their division get the wildcards into the playoffs. They are then seeded 5 and 6 using the same criteria.

The first round of the play-offs is wildcard weekend. In each conference the top 2 seeds get a "bye" in this round: they advance directly to the second round. The third seed hosts the 6th, and the 4th hosts the 5th. This is why the top seed in each conf is said to have "home-field advantage throughout the playoffs": As long as they keep winning they will play at home until the Superbowl, effectively 2 games. Home-field advantage is enormous in AF.

In the next round, the Divisional round, seeds 1 and 2 host the winners of wildcard weekend. The winners of this round move on to the Conference championships and the winners of that go to the Superbowl, which is always played at a warm-weather or domed neutral site.

Unlike the FA, there is no relegation. The teams are fixed. In fact, there are no other fully professional AF leagues anywhere in the world. The CFL -- Canadian Football League -- is very similar to NFL football but differs in key ways. The Arena Football League is a springtime, indoor version of the game played on a much smaller field with fewer players and of lower caliber. There is not much movement by players from either of these leagues into the NFL, but it's not unheard of.

Furthermore, rather than punishing a poor record with relegation, the worst teams are given a boost through the draft (as explained above) The draft is the annual selection of the best college players by the pro teams. A top pick can instantly change the fortunes of a middling team. The worst team picks first, on down to the superbowl-winner who picks 32nd in each round. There are 7 rounds. Picks can be traded for other picks or for players.

A high-draft pick is as valuable as a proven pro player who has had a modicum of success. After the draft, there are large numbers of highly competent undrafted players who can be signed by any team. Their odds of making the team are long, but every team signs 1 or 2 of these "rookie free agents" every year and some have gone on to be Hall of Famers.

Hope that helps.
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  #46  
Old 12.11.2007, 02:46 PM
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Rattez Rattez is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

i have a question ;D in the pros is there any kind of height/weight minimum because most of the players look over 6" and very few seem under 6" that have an offence/defence role except westbrook and maybe few more.
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  #47  
Old 12.11.2007, 04:28 PM
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TheresOnlyOneLT TheresOnlyOneLT is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

There are plenty of players under 6', especially cornerbacks and punt/kick returners, for whom speed is essential. There are a few wide receivers under 6', although height is a definite advantage at that position. And some running backs, especially 3rd-down backs or "scat backs, " are under 6', Tiki Barber being the most prominent example. They tend to be more stout than cornerbacks. Kickers and punters, of course, can be any size and tend to be smaller.

Quarterbacks are rarely under 6' because they need to be able to see over the huge lineman. The most prominent example of a short quarterback is Doug Flutie, a Heisman winner from Boston College, who started out very poorly in the NFL before becoming perhaps the greatest player ever in the CFL (Canadian Football League.) He eventually returned to the NFL in the latter part of his career to some success. I don't think we'll ever see a "short" quarterback like him again.

If you're worried your height will stop you from playing the game, you shouldn't. We're talking about the pros here, there's much more flexibility at lower levels of the game. I played high school ball, at a pretty high level, with guys who were 5'4"-5'5".
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  #48  
Old 14.11.2007, 03:45 PM
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Csonka#39 Csonka#39 is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

West Coast Offence.
Tampa 2
Please explain. . . ;D
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  #49  
Old 17.11.2007, 12:32 PM
bucs_till_death bucs_till_death is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

[quote author=syborg link=board=12;threadid=8473;start=45#msg782066 date=1195055106]
West Coast Offence.
Tampa 2
Please explain. . . ;D
[/quote]
West Coast offense is a system whereby short quick passes are used in order to drive the ball down the field. These result in long drives which take down the clock. The quarterback generally needs to be aware, and have more accuracy, but power is less of a requirement in this type of offense. It's a horizontal passing game and if used correctly, should allow runs to develop as the defense thinks you will pass it. It is also good if a team employing this has a speed receiver who can get deep, as the safeties and cornerbacks may start to bite up if short passes are consistently used. Good example of a team using a west coast passing attack is the Bucs!

Tampa 2 description (Source: Wikipedia)

The personnel used in the Tampa 2 are specific in position and required abilities. All positions in this defense place a premium on speed, and often the result is that they are all undersized by league standards. The defensive linemen in this scheme have to be quick and agile enough to create pressure on the quarterback without the aid of a blitz from either the linebackers or the secondary, with the defensive tackle in the nose position having above-average tackling skills to help stop the run.

The three linebackers and two cornerbacks are responsible for covering the middle of the field. The outside linebackers general zone is between the cornerbacks covering the area of the field from the line of scrimmage to 10 yards back. The middle linebacker must have better-than-average speed, and additional skills to be able to read the play and either maintain his central position to help the outside linebackers cover short passes, drop behind the linebackers in coverage and protect the zone of the field behind the outside linebackers from 11-20 yards out, or run up to the line of scrimmage to help assist in stopping the run. The cornerbacks protect the sidelines of the field from the line of scrimmage to anywhere between 15-20 yards out. An additional requirement for all of Dungy's linebackers and cornerbacks is to be above-average tacklers, as they are usually the primary tacklers in the defense.

The two safeties are responsible for covering their respective halves of the field from 20 yards out and more. The safeties in the system are expected to be above-average cover men with the ability to break up passes, but each safety also is expected to have additional specific skills. The strong safeties, while not expected to be great tacklers, are expected to be hard hitters. The hard hitting strong safety protects the middle of the field from being exploited by small, fast wide receivers, and running backs on 'Wheel' routes, by intimidating them to not run their routes in that direction. The free safety will be called upon to do one of two things in certain situations, either blitz the quarterback, requiring him to have the skills necessary to beat a blocking running back or fullback, or to assume the coverage zone left by a blitzing cornerback.

When executed properly, the Tampa 2 defense is difficult to beat, which speaks for its longevity that it has fundamentally not changed since first introduced in 1996. Teams that have been successful against his defense have managed to run the ball up the middle past the defensive tackles, or throw passes in the seams between the outside linebackers and the cornerbacks (often the most effective receiver against a Tampa 2 defense is a Tight End, since they often line up against this seam).

Other tactics that have shown to be effective on occasion are misdirection plays that take advantage of the defensive speed and rely on the defense 'overrunning' the play (such as the middle linebacker rushing to the line of scrimmage on a play-action pass), or overloading the safeties by having multiple receivers running deep routes, creating more targets in a zone than defenders. Recently, certain teams have also been able to exploit the seam between the cornerbacks and the safeties, when the quarterback can throw a pass to a receiver in that seam faster than the safety can rush up to close it and cover the receiver.

Examples of use in the NFL:

After Dungy became head coach of the Indianapolis Colts and Smith became head coach to the Chicago Bears, they installed the Tampa 2 in their respective teams. During the 2005 NFL season, The Buccaneers, still under defensive coordinator Kiffin, ranked first in the league in total yards allowed, Smith's Bears ranked number two, and Dungy's Colts ranked eleventh. In the 2006-2007 season, the Buffalo Bills, Minnesota Vikings, Kansas City Chiefs, and Detroit Lions adopted the defense.
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  #50  
Old 19.11.2007, 07:08 PM
Matt Ford Matt Ford is offline
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Default Re:Frequently Asked Questions

during a running play at what point does the ball go dead? is it simply where the ball carrier is stopped? or what

its probably very simple i just cant seem to see it ???
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